The Path Through The Wilderness: The Elements of Project Management for Rapid Learning Cycles

Key Takeaways:

  • Traditional project management methods break down in projects that are being structured as Rapid Learning Cycles.
  • These projects need to track Key Decisions, Knowledge Gaps and Activities in order to manage the team’s workflow at all levels.
  • There are five elements of the project management method for Rapid Learning Cycles.

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Author: 
Katherine Radeka
Created: 
January 15th, 2013
Updated: 
January 15th, 2013
Platform Development Charters: Setting the Stage for Platform Development

Key Takeaways:

  • Product Platform Architectures eliminate waste along the entire value stream.
  • Levels of modularity allow a company to adopt a Platform Architecture strategy that fits their industry, product strategy and customer needs even in situations with high demands for tightly integrated product designs.
  • Platform architecture teams require clear strategic objectives to guide their decisions.

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Author: 
Katherine Radeka
Created: 
September 8th, 2008
Updated: 
March 20th, 2012

This is the template to use for a Status A3 Report.

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Author: 
Katherine Radeka
Created: 
March 18th, 2012
Updated: 
March 18th, 2012

This is an example of a Status Report A3.

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Author: 
Katherine Radeka
Created: 
March 18th, 2012
Updated: 
March 18th, 2012

This is an example of a Documentation Replacement A3. It replaces a Feature Request document by summarizing the key information on a single A3 report.

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Author: 
Katherine Radeka
Created: 
March 18th, 2012
Updated: 
March 18th, 2012
A Checklist for Designing a Checklist: How to Design Checklists That Get Checked

Key Takeaways:

  • Checklists are a useful tool for preventing mistakes - when they get used.
  • Product developers respond especially poorly to externally-imposed checklists, but respond well to the requirement to develop their own.
  • Good checklists are short, focused on the critical few, and designed to support judgement rather than replace it.

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Author: 
Katherine Radeka
Created: 
September 29th, 2011
Updated: 
September 29th, 2011
How to Convert a Project-Specific A3 into Reusable Knowledge

Key Takeaways:

  • The fastest way to begin building a library of reusable knowledge is to become skilled at converting Problem-Solving and Proposal A3s into Knowledge Capture A3s.
  • Most of the sections of the original A3 will just need to be updated to reflect the current state of the implementation.
  • The author will add sections to capture lessons learned and make actionable recommendations to help the next reader apply them.

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Author: 
Katherine Radeka
Created: 
February 17th, 2011
Updated: 
February 17th, 2011
Have It Your Way: The Five Types of A3 Reports

Key Takeaways:

  • An A3 report is a highly effective communication tool.
  • There are five types of A3 reports: Knowledge Capture, Problem-Solving, Proposal, Documentation Replacement and Status Report, in order from most flexible to most standardized in layout, sections and formatting.
  • The purpose of the A3 determines the type of A3 that you need to write.

Have It Your Way


Type: Knowledge Brief
Tabloid (A3): 11x17 (PDF)
Letter (A4): 8.5x11 (PDF)

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Author: 
Katherine Radeka
Created: 
July 29th, 2010
Updated: 
July 29th, 2010
Tacit Knowledge: When Documentation Is Not Enough

Key Takeaways:

  • Poorly-written documentation does not transfer knowledge because it is not well-understood, believed or actionable. At best, such documents provide information.
  • Even the best documentation cannot communicate everything that a person needs to know because tacit knowledge does not lend itself to documentation.
  • Externalization, guided experiences and reflection help transfer tacit knowledge.

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Author: 
Katherine Radeka
Created: 
June 29th, 2010
Updated: 
June 29th, 2010
Visible Planning: How Visible Plans Help Teams Get More Done

Key Takeaways:

  • A Visual Project Board is a visual model of a team’s project information, in a location where all members of the extended team can easily see it, and a core team can easily keep it up to date.
  • Visual Project Planning makes the information typically stored in status reports and project management systems more visible to the team and their stakeholders.
  • A few simple rules makes it easy for a team leader to keep the boards up to date.

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Author: 
Katherine Radeka
Created: 
April 26th, 2010
Updated: 
April 26th, 2010
Learning to See Waste in New Product Development

Key Takeaways:

  • Knowledge is the “product” of product development, driving value creation.
  • Waste is harder to see in product development because knowledge is invisible.
  • Seven indicators highlight waste in product development.

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Author: 
Katherine Radeka
Created: 
October 13th, 2009
Updated: 
October 13th, 2009