The Five Disciplines of Innovation Through Lean: How to Prepare Your Company to Find the Next Breakthrough

Key Takeaways:

  • Innovation is a creative process, and creative processes thrive on discipline.
  • The primary discipline of the Innovation Process is systematic problem-solving, to help you find new solutions and qualify your ideas with objectivity and respect for people.
  • Five disciplines prepare your company to find the next breakthrough.

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Author: 
Katherine Radeka
Created: 
January 20th, 2014
Updated: 
January 20th, 2014
Innovation Through Lean: Novel Solutions to Your Most Important Problems

Key Takeaways:

  • Innovation is defined as "the process of finding novel solutions to important problems."
  • Lean has been linked with Manufacturing and Process Innovation from its beginning.
  • Lean practices not only help eliminate waste that gets in the way of innovation - Lean Thinking directly helps you become more innovative.

 

 

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Author: 
Katherine Radeka
Created: 
January 7th, 2014
Updated: 
January 7th, 2014
The Lean Product Development Tool Room: A Flexible Toolkit to Provide the Right Tool for the Job

Key Takeaways:

  • A toolkit is an organized collection of tools - and a tool is simply something that will help you live into the Principles and Practices of Lean Product Development.
  • Teams need the freedom to choose the right tool for the job.
  • Teams also need a “starter toolkit” including common tools for systematic problem-solving.

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Author: 
Katherine Radeka
Created: 
November 15th, 2013
Updated: 
November 15th, 2013
The Lean Patient: How to Use Systematic Problem-Solving to Empower Yourself as a Patient or Caregiver

Key Takeaways:

 

  • Lean Patients are empowered to help doctors give them and their loved ones the best care, by helping them fully prepare and get the most out of their doctor visits.
  • A3 reports improve communication and save time in the treatment room by summarizing the most important information in a format that a busy doctor can digest.
  • The more serious it is, the more you need to be a Lean Patient.

The Lean Patient


Type: Knowledge Brief
Tabloid (A3): 11x17 (PDF)
Letter (A4): 8.5x11 (PDF)

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Author: 
Katherine Radeka
Created: 
July 2nd, 2013
Updated: 
July 2nd, 2013

 

This A3 example is a treatment plan for a person with a long-term knee condition related to a sports injury.
 
It includes a pain map, an example graph, an Objectives Continuum and tables for treatment alternatives and Next Steps.
 
This template may be freely shared and the link to this file will stay on the public side of the LPDRC, so you may link to it from external sites.

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Author: 
Gene Radeka
Created: 
July 2nd, 2013
Updated: 
July 2nd, 2013

 

This A3 template is to help you document your current observations and treatment plan.
 
It includes a pain map, an example graph, an Objectives Continuum and tables for treatment alternatives and Next Steps.
 
This template may be freely shared and the link to this file will stay on the public side of the LPDRC, so you may link to it from external sites.

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Author: 
Gene Radeka
Created: 
July 2nd, 2013
Updated: 
July 2nd, 2013

This A3 example is an A3 that I prepared for a doctor's visit to get treatment for a mild asthma attack.

It's the A3 example from  "The Lean Patient: How to Use Systematic Problem-Solving to Empower Yourself as a Patient or Caregiver."

This example may be freely shared and the link to this file will stay on the public side of the LPDRC, so you may link to it from external sites.

For a full list of resources for Lean Patients, click here.

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Author: 
Katherine Radeka
Created: 
July 2nd, 2013
Updated: 
July 2nd, 2013
Help Your Pilot Teams Over the Bar: Run Them as the Experiments They Are

Key Takeaways:

  • A pilot team is an experiment.
  • Like any experiment, a pilot team needs a well-defined hypothesis.
  • There are only two things that can cause a pilot team to fail - and both of them are within your control as the lean product development champion.

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Author: 
Katherine Radeka
Created: 
May 10th, 2013
Updated: 
May 10th, 2013
The “Business Casual” A3 Report: Why Handwritten A3 Reports Drive Collaboration and Creativity

Key Takeaways:

  • The informality of handwritten A3 reports improves collaboration and creativity in systematic problem-solving.
  • You can write an A3 report on a blank sheet of paper, make a “giant A3” on a whiteboard or keep a notebook for your personal A3s.
  • The benefits of handwritten reports outweigh the fears that your writing isn’t readable.

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Author: 
Katherine Radeka
Created: 
May 3rd, 2013
Updated: 
May 3rd, 2013
The Evolution of an A3: How A3s Change Over the Life of a Problem to Build Reusable Knowledge

Key Takeaways:

  • Problem-solving A3s often evolve into Proposal A3s.
  • Any type of A3 can evolve into a Knowledge Capture A3 - in fact, this is one of the best ways to begin capturing reusable knowledge.
  • Your investment in the evolution of your A3 pays off in the increased impact your ideas will have on the whole organization.

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Author: 
Gene Radeka
Created: 
February 20th, 2013
Updated: 
February 20th, 2013
Systems Thinking, Lean Thinking: Root Cause Analysis for Complex Systems

Key Takeaways:

  • Lean tools like kanban systems and SBCE work because they address the complex causes of problems in manufacturing, product development and other parts of the enterprise.
  • Causal loop diagrams make the feedback loops visible for complex problems.
  • We find better solutions to complex problems when we understand the feedback loops and look for points of leverage to mitigate harmful loops and reinforce helpful ones.

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Author: 
Katherine Radeka
Created: 
September 23rd, 2011
Updated: 
March 20th, 2012